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A different Moore or more of the same?

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A review of Michael Moore’s Here Comes Trouble

Buy this book on AmazonWhatever you think of Michael Moore’s movies, you can’t say the guy hasn’t lived an interesting life. Listening in on his very personal anecdotes about everything from protesting Reagan at a SS soldier memorial in Bitburg, Germany; to receiving death threats after his memorable reception speech at the Oscar’s in 2003, is truly an illuminating experience.

Growing up in Flint, Michigan, and experiencing the senseless business policies exerted upon the population by General Motors throughout the later half of the last century, Moore’s heart lies with the working people, and he seems always to be on a mission to speak their voice.

Here Comes Trouble is organized into self-contained stories, ranging from starting up the Flint Voice newspaper in response to the established local news outlet being in the hands of GM, to personal conversations with a Roman Catholic bishop to the making of his first film Roger and Me.

Moore’s ability to capture an audience easily transfers to a biographical format, due to his shear willingness to expose his vulnerability. His insecurity, shyness and self-conscious affliction makes for a bumpy ride. As Moore himself admits, he is innately pessimistic about pretty much everything, even when he experiences success.

The pessimistic attitude mirrors Moore’s gloomy character known from his documentary films, and his huge capacity for self-irony adds another dimension to whatever picture you may already have drawn from his political agenda.

Moore’s films are centered on issues he cares about; his book is more about himself than anything else.